Its Saturday Morning, Got to give it up

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Sunday Night Playlist

  • Pink Floyd – Run Like Hell
  • Kanye West – New Workout Plan
  • Kanye West – Runaway
  • Jon Brion – Strings that tie to you
  • Blur – Girls & Boys
  • Bruce Springsteen – How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times And Live
  • Common – Testify

Podcast Playlist

  1. The Nerdist
  2. Hang up and listen (Slate)
  3. TBTL with Luke Burbank
  4. Kunstlercast
  5. Rich Eisen Podcast
  6. Planet Money

The Five Bases of Power Playlist

Kanye West – Power

Petty authority [also: “petty tyranny[1]” or, colloquially “petty power”] is authority exercised by a leader, frequently unchosen by the led, in a relatively limited or intimate environment, such as that exercised by a teacher over students in a classroom. It is a pejorative term, that carries with it a sense of authority that was gained, or is used, in an unfair or capricious manner.

Five bases of power

Social psychologists John R. P. French and Bertram Raven, in a now-classic study (1959),[6] developed a schema of sources of power by which to analyse how power plays work (or fail to work) in a specific relationship.

According to French and Raven, power must be distinguished from influence in the following way: power is that state of affairs which holds in a given relationship, A-B, such that a given influence attempt by A over B makes A’s desired change in B more likely. Conceived this way, power is fundamentally relative – it depends on the specific understandings A and B each apply to their relationship, and, interestingly, requires B’s recognition of a quality in A which would motivate B to change in the way A intends. A must draw on the ‘base’ or combination of bases of power appropriate to the relationship, to effect the desired outcome. Drawing on the wrong power base can have unintended effects, including a reduction in A’s own power.

French and Raven argue that there are five significant categories of such qualities, while not excluding other minor categories. Further bases have since been adduced – in particular by Morgan (1986: ch.6),[7] who identifies 14, while others have suggested a simpler model for practical purposes – for example, Handy (1976), [8] who recommends three.

Positional power
Also called “legitimate power”, it is the power of an individual because of the relative position and duties of the holder of the position within an organization. Legitimate power is formal authority delegated to the holder of the position. It is usually accompanied by various attributes of power such as uniforms, offices etc. This is the most obvious and also the most important kind of power.
Referent power
Referent power is the power or ability of individuals to attract others and build loyalty. It’s based on the charisma and interpersonal skills of the power holder. A person may be admired because of specific personal trait, and this admiration creates the opportunity for interpersonal influence. Here the person under power desires to identify with these personal qualities, and gains satisfaction from being an accepted follower. Nationalism and patriotism count towards an intangible sort of referent power. For example, soldiers fight in wars to defend the honor of the country. This is the second least obvious power, but the most effective. Advertisers have long used the referent power of sports figures for products endorsements, for example. The charismatic appeal of the sports star supposedly leads to an acceptance of the endorsement, although the individual may have little real credibility outside the sports arena.[9]
Expert power
Expert power is an individual’s power deriving from the skills or expertise of the person and the organization’s needs for those skills and expertise. Unlike the others, this type of power is usually highly specific and limited to the particular area in which the expert is trained and qualified.
Reward power
Reward power depends on the ability of the power wielder to confer valued material rewards, it refers to the degree to which the individual can give others a reward of some kind such as benefits, time off, desired gifts, promotions or increases in pay or responsibility. This power is obvious but also ineffective if abused. People who abuse reward power can become pushy or became reprimanded for being too forthcoming or ‘moving things too quickly’.
Coercive power
Coercive power is the application of negative influences. It includes the ability to demote or to withhold other rewards. The desire              for valued rewards or the fear of having them withheld that ensures the obedience of those under power. Coercive power tends to                be the most obvious but least effective form of power as it builds resentment and resistance from the people who experience it.

John Salley


Spider & The Henchman

In physics, power is the rate at which work is performed or energy is converted[1][2]

If ΔW is the amount of work performed during a period of time of duration Δt, the average power Pavg over that period is given by the formula

 P_\mathrm{avg} = \frac{\Delta W}{\Delta t}\,.

It is the average amount of work done or energy converted per unit of time. The average power is often simply called “power” when the context makes it clear.

The instantaneous power is then the limiting value of the average power as the time interval Δt approaches zero.

 P = \lim _{\Delta t\rightarrow 0} P_\mathrm{avg} = \lim _{\Delta t\rightarrow 0} \frac{\Delta W}{\Delta t} =  \frac{dW}{dt}\,.

In the case of constant power P, the amount of work performed during a period of duration T is given by:

 W = PT\,.

In the context of energy conversion it is more customary to use the symbol E rather than W.

Kanye West – Runaway